11/5/18

Interesting to note that I have been very meat oriented lately and that my runs (ok ,jogs) yesterday were faster than ever and that with the second 2+ mile run I added over 1/2 mile to be longest jog.  Total 5.3 miles.  Today NO soreness.  Today I did the now routine 1+ mile and 22 minute day after jog – tired but no pain.

The toe bleeding thing: I have been running barefoot and minimal shoes for several years. These days I often (usually) run barefoot and last week did the 4+ miles totally barefoot.  The toe bleeding (left 2nd) started 6-9 months ago, and is worse if I run counter clockwise.  I have noticed that the same right toe flexes differently when running, and puts the bottom of the toe down each time.  No idea of what is happening.

Lifting: today was chest day – slowly adding weight and reps and no right shoulder pain. Though I can feel where it used to hurt.

 

Today’s sort of rant:

Dr Marion Nestle of NYU discussed the role of the food companies in research, in an article from DietDoctor.com.

“Nestle has a new book out, aptly named Unsavory Truth: How food companies skew the science of what we eat. In it, she covers the story of a nutrition research community’s deep reliance on industry funding. Nestle points out that industry-funded studies almost always show favorable, food-marketing-friendly results. Why? She contends it is not because of shady scientists, but rather, because corporate funders control the design and interpretation of the research. Nestle explains:”

Food companies don’t want to fund studies that won’t help them sell products. So I consider this kind of research marketing, not science. People who do the studies say the conduct of their science is fine, and it well may be. But research on where the bias comes in says the real problem is in the design of the research question — the way the question gets asked — and the interpretation of results. That’s where the influence tends to show up.

In other words make them answer your question rather than find the facts.

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